SESSION FOUR: TORRES/LISTORTI

Saturday 28 March, 18:00-19:30, ICA 

Booking link

UK premieres of found footage works by Leandro Listorti and John Torres

Films: We Still Have to Close Our Eyes, John Torres, Philippines, 2019, DCP, English, 13 minutes, UK premiere

The Endless Film (La película infinita), Leandro Listorti, Argentina, 2018, DCP, Spanish with English subtitles, 53 minutes, UK premiere

The screening will be introduced by Matthew Barrington and Catherine Grant, Essay Film Festival.

With the support of the CHASE Doctoral Training Partnership.

A found footage short, We Still Have to Close Our Eyes is the latest film by celebrated Filipino filmmaker John Torres. Constructed from B-roll and unused footage from the sets of a number of recent film productions from the Philippines, including works by celebrated directors Lav Diaz and Erik Matti. Torres interweaves this repurposed material into a sci-fi narrative exploring the controlling presence of police and government through social media and applications.

Leandro Listorti’s first feature-length work, The Endless Film (La película infinita), is an expansive multi-layered compilation film assembled in the archives of the Buenos Aires film museum where the filmmaker is employed. This cinematic experiment retrieves fragments of films that were unfinished or lost, investing new life into objects considered incomplete and invisible, were it not for their reappearance in this new artistic context. The film acts as a valuable film-historical document, showcasing the various thematic and aesthetic currents that Argentinian filmmakers have engaged with from the 1950s to celebrated directors of the so-called ‘New Argentine Cinema’. Archives, memories, traces and remains, these are of fundamental importance for understanding the past, present and future of a country whose records have been routinely buried, burnt and destroyed. In this way, The Endless Film offers a window to forgotten memories, and the work becomes an elegy for the ghosts of Argentina’s dictatorial past. At the same time, the film offers an insight into the materiality of filmmaking, subtly drawing our attention to aspects of production processes such as countdown timers and pen-marked film strips, while the soundtrack makes use of extracts of dialogue and other extraneous audible elements that emerge from behind the camera on a film set. The use of damaged film footage (tramlines, scratches, faded colours, etc.) incorporates new physical elements into the texture of Listorti’s ‘endless film’.

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