EFLUX: Orphans of politics: A conversation with Lea Melandri by Christina Chalmers

EFF 2022: The Work We Share Programme showcases 10 newly digitised films from the Cinenova collection between 19 and 20 March 2022 at the Institute of Contemporary Art in London. The final programme features the Adriana Monti’s documentary film School Without End (Scuola senza fine) dealing with working class women’s experiences in Italy during the 1970s.

“A group of women following the worker-union-sponsored “150 hours” course to complete their secondary school education are mentored by feminist, activist, and writer Lea Melandri. Adriana Monti follows the women as they reconsider their role as housewives and the effects of this type of political education on their self-narration.”

Discover more about the film School Without End: Read Orphans of politics: A conversation with Lea Melandri on dependency, autonomy, love by Christina Chalmers at e-flux Video & Film:

Scuola senza fine (School Without End) – Video & Film – e-flux

Screen Slate: On Prisms and Portraits: The Films of Rosine Mbakam by Yasmina Price

The Essay Film Festival presents the first UK retrospective of the work of Rosine Mbakam between 19 and 23 April 2022 at the Institute of Contemporary Art and the Birkbeck Cinema in London. The screenings of Prism and Two Faces of A Bamiléké Woman will be followed by conversations with Rosine Mbakam.

”Critiques of the racism in the film industry often pass over the camera itself as a complicit agent. Never neutral, visual technologies are clearly marked and shaped by ideological forces. Photography developed over the course of the nineteenth century, meaning the camera emerged during one of the peaks of Western colonialism and imperialism. Not only did photographic technologies coincide with these projects of domination, they facilitated the categorization and regulation of oppressed populations…The false premise of the objectivity of visual technologies is the starting point for Prism (2021), a collaborative documentary between Cameroonian Rosine Mbakam, Burkinabé Eléonore Yameogo, and Belgian An van. Dienderen. The film is stylistically variable, assembled from interview clips, behind the scenes footage, recorded Skype conversations, and a few more abstract and theatrical sequences. Prism was conceived as a “chain letter,” a visual relay between the filmmakers.”

To read the article On Prisms and Portraits: The Films of Rosine Mbakam by Yasmina Price, visit Screen Slate (NYC):

On Prisms and Portraits: The Films of Rosine Mbakam | Screen Slate

WFTHN: Becoming Sheffield Film Co-Op, A Brief History by Angela Martin

The Essay Film Festival presents A Question of Choice (Sheffield Film Co-Op, UK, 1982) as part of our EFF 2022 The Work We Share Programme 3 taking place at the Institute of Contemporary Art, London (20 March, 6.30pm).

”Sheffield Film Co-op did not begin its life fully formed as a filmmaking group. It grew out of the new/second women’s liberation movement of the early 70s, which was variously engaging in raising consciousness about issues women faced in their domestic and/or work lives. This engagement produced differing analyses, ideas and practical approaches and soon highlighted the need to disseminate feminist ideas about the issues to a wider audience than those women already attending meetings.” (Angela Martin)

To read about the history of the Co-Op, read the full article by Angela Martin at:

Becoming Sheffield Film Co-op – Women’s Film and Television History Network – UK/Ireland